Alin Serdean from Cloudbase Solutions shows you how to deploy Open vSwitch (OVS) on Hyper-V and integrate it with OpenStack in this four-part series.

We are happy to announce the availability of Open vSwitch 2.5 (OVS) for Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2012, 2012 R2 and 2016 (technical preview) thanks to the joint effort of Cloudbase Solutions, VMware and the Open vSwitch community.

The OVS 2.5 release includes the Open vSwitch CLI tools and services (ovsdb-server, ovs-vswitchd, ovs-vsctl, ovs-ofctl, etc.) and an updated version of the OVS Hyper-V virtual switch forwarding extension, providing fully interoperable GRE, VXLAN and STT encapsulation between Hyper-V and Linux, including KVM-based virtual machines.

As usual, we released an MSI installer for Windows machines that takes care of ovsdb-server and ovs-vswitchd daemons along with all the required binaries and configurations.

All Open vSwitch code is available here:

https://github.com/openvswitch/ovs/tree/branch-2.5
https://github.com/cloudbase/ovs/tree/branch-2.5-cloudbase

Supported Windows operating systems:

  • Windows Server and Hyper-V Server 2012 and 2012 R2.
  • Windows Server and Hyper-V Server 2016 (technical preview).
  • Windows 8, 8.1 and 10.

Installing Open vSwitch on Hyper-V

The entire installation process is seamless. Download our installer and run it. You will be welcomed by the following screen:

 

Windows

Click “Next” and accept the license, click “Next” again and you’ll have the option to install both the Hyper-V virtual switch extension driver and the command-line tools. If you want to install only the command-line tools (in order to be able to connect to a Linux or Windows server), just deselect the driver option.

Open vSwitch 2.5 Hyper-V Setup on Windows

Click “Next” followed by “Install” and the installation will start. You’ll have to confirm that you want to install the signed kernel driver, then the process will be completed in a few seconds, generating an Open vSwitch database and starting the ovsdb-server and ovs-vswitchd services.

OVSHVSetup3_1

The installer also adds the “command-line tools” folder to the system path, available after the next log on or CLI shell execution.

Unattended installation

Fully unattended installation is also available (if you already have accepted/imported our certificate). This helps to install Open vSwitch with Windows GPOs, Puppet, Chef, SaltStack, DSC or any other automated deployment solution:

msiexec /i openvswitch-hyperv-2.5.0.msi /l*v log.txt

Configuring Open vSwitch on Windows

Let’s assume that we have the following environment: a host with four Ethernet cards in which we shall bind a Hyper-V Virtual Switch on top of one of them.

The list of adapters:

PS C:\package> Get-NetAdapter

Name                      InterfaceDescription                    ifIndex Status       MacAddress             LinkSpeed
----                      --------------------                    ------- ------       ----------             ---------
port3                     Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Co...#3      26 Up           00-0C-29-40-8B-EA         1 Gbps
nat                       Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Co...#4      27 Up           00-0C-29-40-8B-E0         1 Gbps
port2                     Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Co...#2      18 Up           00-0C-29-40-8B-D6         1 Gbps
port1                     Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Conn...      17 Up           00-0C-29-40-8B-CC         1 Gbps
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
PS C:\package> Get-NetAdapter
 
Name                      InterfaceDescription                    ifIndex Status       MacAddress             LinkSpeed
----                      --------------------                    ------- ------       ----------             ---------
port3                     Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Co...#3      26 Up           00-0C-29-40-8B-EA         1 Gbps
nat                       Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Co...#4      27 Up           00-0C-29-40-8B-E0         1 Gbps
port2                     Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Co...#2      18 Up           00-0C-29-40-8B-D6         1 Gbps
port1                     Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Conn...      17 Up           00-0C-29-40-8B-CC         1 Gbps

Create a Hyper-V external virtual switch with the AllowManagementOS flag set to false.

For example:

PS C:\package> New-VMSwitch -Name vSwitch -NetAdapterName port1 -AllowManagementOS $false
 
Name    SwitchType NetAdapterInterfaceDescription
----    ---------- ------------------------------
vSwitch External   Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Connection

To verify that the extension has been installed on our system:

PS C:\package> Get-VMSwitchExtension -VMSwitchName vSwitch -Name "Open vSwitch Extension"
 
Id                  : 583CC151-73EC-4A6A-8B47-578297AD7623
Name                : Open vSwitch Extension
Vendor              : Open vSwitch
Version             : 13.43.16.16
ExtensionType       : Forwarding
ParentExtensionId   :
ParentExtensionName :
SwitchId            : 5844f4dd-b3d7-496c-81cb-481a64fa7f58
SwitchName          : vSwitch
Enabled             : False
Running             : False
ComputerName        : HYPERV_NORMAL_1
Key                 :
IsDeleted           : False

We can now enable the OVS extension on the vSwitch virtual switch:

PS C:\package> Enable-VMSwitchExtension -VMSwitchName vSwitch -Name "Open vSwitch Extension"
 
Id                  : 583CC151-73EC-4A6A-8B47-578297AD7623
Name                : Open vSwitch Extension
Vendor              : Open vSwitch
Version             : 13.43.16.16
ExtensionType       : Forwarding
ParentExtensionId   :
ParentExtensionName :
SwitchId            : 5844f4dd-b3d7-496c-81cb-481a64fa7f58
SwitchName          : vSwitch
Enabled             : True
Running             : True
ComputerName        : HYPERV_NORMAL_1
Key                 :
IsDeleted           : False

Please note that when you enable the extension, the virtual switch will stop forwarding traffic until it is configured (adding the Ethernet adapter under a bridge).

i.e.

PS C:\package> ovs-vsctl.exe add-br br-port1
PS C:\package> ovs-vsctl.exe add-port br-port1 port1

Let’s talk in more detail about the two commands issued above.

The first command:

PS C:\package> ovs-vsctl.exe add-br br-port1

will add a new adapter on the host, which is disabled by default:

PS C:\package> Get-NetAdapter
 
Name                      InterfaceDescription                    ifIndex Status       MacAddress             LinkSpeed
----                      --------------------                    ------- ------       ----------             ---------
br-port1                  Hyper-V Virtual Ethernet Adapter #2          47 Disabled     00-15-5D-00-62-79        10 Gbps
port3                     Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Co...#3      26 Up           00-0C-29-40-8B-EA         1 Gbps
nat                       Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Co...#4      27 Up           00-0C-29-40-8B-E0         1 Gbps
port2                     Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Co...#2      18 Up           00-0C-29-40-8B-D6         1 Gbps
port1                     Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Conn...      17 Up           00-0C-29-40-8B-CC         1 Gbps

This adapter can be used as an IP-able device:

PS C:\package> Enable-NetAdapter br-port1
PS C:\package> New-NetIPAddress -IPAddress 14.14.14.2 -InterfaceAlias br-port1 -PrefixLength 24
 
IPAddress         : 14.14.14.2
InterfaceIndex    : 47
InterfaceAlias    : br-port1
AddressFamily     : IPv4
Type              : Unicast
PrefixLength      : 24
PrefixOrigin      : Manual
SuffixOrigin      : Manual
AddressState      : Tentative
ValidLifetime     : Infinite ([TimeSpan]::MaxValue)
PreferredLifetime : Infinite ([TimeSpan]::MaxValue)
SkipAsSource      : False
PolicyStore       : ActiveStore
 
IPAddress         : 14.14.14.2
InterfaceIndex    : 47
InterfaceAlias    : br-port1
AddressFamily     : IPv4
Type              : Unicast
PrefixLength      : 24
PrefixOrigin      : Manual
SuffixOrigin      : Manual
AddressState      : Invalid
ValidLifetime     : Infinite ([TimeSpan]::MaxValue)
PreferredLifetime : Infinite ([TimeSpan]::MaxValue)
SkipAsSource      : False
PolicyStore       : PersistentStore 

The second command:

PS C:\package> ovs-vsctl.exe add-port br-port1 port1

will allow the bridge to use the actual physical NIC on which the Hyper-V vSwitch was created (port1).

Users from Linux are familiar with the setup above because it is similar to a linux bridge.

Limitations

  • We currently support a single Hyper-V virtual switch in our forwarding extension.
  • Multiple host nics with LACP support is experimental in this release.

OpenStack Integration with Open vSwitch on Windows

OpenStack is a very common use case for Open vSwitch on Hyper-V. The following example is based on a DevStack, Mitaka, All-in-One deployment on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with a Hyper-V compute node, but the concepts and the following steps apply to any OpenStack deployment.

Let us install our DevStack node. Here is a sample local.conf configuration:

[email protected]:~/devstack$ cat local.conf 
[[local|localrc]]
# Set this to your management IP
HOST_IP=14.14.14.1
FORCE=yes
 
#Services to be started
disable_service n-net
 
enable_service rabbit mysql
enable_service key
enable_service n-api n-crt n-obj n-cond n-sch n-cauth n-cpu
enable_service neutron q-svc q-agt q-dhcp q-l3 q-meta q-fwaas q-lbaas 
enable_service horizon
enable_service g-api g-reg
 
disable_service heat h-api h-api-cfn h-api-cw h-eng
disable_service cinder c-api c-vol c-sch
disable_service tempest
 
ENABLE_TENANT_TUNNELS=False
Q_PLUGIN=ml2
Q_ML2_TENANT_NETWORK_TYPE=vxlan
Q_ML2_PLUGIN_MECHANISM_DRIVERS=openvswitch,hyperv
OVS_ENABLE_TUNNELING=True
 
LIBVIRT_TYPE=kvm
 
API_RATE_LIMIT=False
 
DATABASE_PASSWORD=Passw0rd
RABBIT_PASSWORD=Passw0rd
SERVICE_TOKEN=Passw0rd
SERVICE_PASSWORD=Passw0rd
ADMIN_PASSWORD=Passw0rd
 
SCREEN_LOGDIR=$DEST/logs/screen
LOGFILE=$DEST/logs/stack.sh.log
VERBOSE=True
LOGDAYS=2
 
RECLONE=no
 
KEYSTONE_BRANCH=stable/mitaka
NOVA_BRANCH=stable/mitaka
NEUTRON_BRANCH=stable/mitaka
SWIFT_BRANCH=stable/mitaka
GLANCE_BRANCH=stable/mitaka
CINDER_BRANCH=stable/mitaka
HEAT_BRANCH=stable/mitaka
TROVE_BRANCH=stable/mitaka
HORIZON_BRANCH=stable/mitaka
 
[[post-config|$NEUTRON_CONF]]
[database]
min_pool_size = 5
max_pool_size = 50
max_overflow = 50

Networking:

[email protected]:~/devstack$ ifconfig eth3
eth3      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:0c:29:25:db:8c  
          inet addr:14.14.14.1  Bcast:14.14.14.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
          inet6 addr: fe80::20c:29ff:fe25:db8c/64 Scope:Link
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:2209 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:1007 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 
          RX bytes:336185 (336.1 KB)  TX bytes:153402 (153.4 KB)

After DevStack finishes installing we can add some Hyper-V VHD or VHDX images to Glance, such as our Windows Server 2012 R2 evaluation image. Additionally, since we are using VXLAN, the default guest MTU should be set to 1450. This can be done via DHCP option if the guest supports it, as described here.

Now let us move to the Hyper-V node. First we have to download the latest OpenStack compute installer:

PS C:\package> Start-BitsTransfer https://cloudbase.it/downloads/HyperVNovaCompute_Mitaka_13_0_0.msi

Full steps on how to install and configure OpenStack on Hyper-V are available here: OpenStack on Windows installation.

In our example, the Hyper-V node will use the following adapter to connect to the OpenStack environment:

Ethernet adapter br-port1:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::9c1a:f185:bb09:62e2%47
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 14.14.14.2
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

This is the internal adapter bound to the vSwitch virtual switch, as created during the previous steps (ovs-vsctl add-br br-port1).

We can now verify our deployment by taking a look at the Nova services and Neutron agents status in the OpenStack controller and ensuring that they are up and running:

[email protected]:~/devstack$ nova service-list
+----+------------------+-----------------+----------+---------+-------+----------------------------+-----------------+
| Id | Binary           | Host            | Zone     | Status  | State | Updated_at                 | Disabled Reason |
+----+------------------+-----------------+----------+---------+-------+----------------------------+-----------------+
| 5  | nova-conductor   | ubuntu          | internal | enabled | up    | 2016-04-26T20:09:44.000000 | -               |
| 6  | nova-cert        | ubuntu          | internal | enabled | up    | 2016-04-26T20:09:39.000000 | -               |
| 7  | nova-scheduler   | ubuntu          | internal | enabled | up    | 2016-04-26T20:09:45.000000 | -               |
| 8  | nova-consoleauth | ubuntu          | internal | enabled | up    | 2016-04-26T20:09:46.000000 | -               |
| 9  | nova-compute     | ubuntu          | nova     | enabled | up    | 2016-04-26T20:09:48.000000 | -               |
| 10 | nova-compute     | hyperv_normal_1 | nova     | enabled | up    | 2016-04-26T20:09:39.000000 | -               |
+----+------------------+-----------------+----------+---------+-------+----------------------------+-----------------+
[email protected]:~/devstack$ neutron agent-list
+--------------------------------------+--------------------+-----------------+-------------------+-------+----------------+---------------------------+
| id                                   | agent_type         | host            | availability_zone | alive | admin_state_up | binary                    |
+--------------------------------------+--------------------+-----------------+-------------------+-------+----------------+---------------------------+
| 1bb8eccc-ad8c-43c2-a54e-d84c6cd7acd4 | DHCP agent         | ubuntu          | nova              | :-)   | True           | neutron-dhcp-agent        |
| 3d89e79d-3cb4-4a10-ae01-773b86f83fb2 | Loadbalancer agent | ubuntu          |                   | :-)   | True           | neutron-lbaas-agent       |
| 7777a901-0c58-4180-8d01-4ea3296621a4 | Open vSwitch agent | ubuntu          |                   | :-)   | True           | neutron-openvswitch-agent |
| 93d6390a-19d2-4c79-8f76-90736bc47f5f | HyperV agent       | hyperv_normal_1 |                   | :-)   | True           | neutron-hyperv-agent      |
| c3af1d4b-5bba-47b0-b0db-b3c0d49bb41a | Metadata agent     | ubuntu          |                   | :-)   | True           | neutron-metadata-agent    |
| ec9bc28c-a5ee-4733-8b9c-3a1f99c42f08 | L3 agent           | ubuntu          | nova              | :-)   | True           | neutron-l3-agent          |
+--------------------------------------+--------------------+-----------------+-------------------+-------+----------------+---------------------------+

Next we can disable the Windows Hyper-V agent, which is not needed since we use neutron Open vSwitch agent.

From a command prompt (cmd.exe), issue the following commands:

C:\package>sc config "neutron-hyperv-agent" start=disabled
[SC] ChangeServiceConfig SUCCESS
 
C:\package>sc stop "neutron-hyperv-agent"
 
SERVICE_NAME: neutron-hyperv-agent
        TYPE               : 10  WIN32_OWN_PROCESS
        STATE              : 1  STOPPED
        WIN32_EXIT_CODE    : 0  (0x0)
        SERVICE_EXIT_CODE  : 0  (0x0)
        CHECKPOINT         : 0x0
        WAIT_HINT          : 0x0

We need to create a new service called neutron-ovs-agent and put its configuration options in C:\Program Files\Cloudbase Solutions\OpenStack\Nova\etc\neutron_ovs_agent.conf.

From a command prompt:

C:\Users\Administrator>sc create neutron-ovs-agent binPath= "\"C:\Program Files\Cloudbase Solutions\OpenStack\Nova\bin\OpenStackServiceNeutron.exe\" neutron-hyperv-agent \"C:\Program Files\Cloudbase Solutions\OpenStack\Nova\Python27\Scripts\neutron-openvswitch-agent.exe\" --config-file \"C:\Program Files\Cloudbase Solutions\OpenStack\Nova\etc\neutron_ovs_agent.conf\"" type= own start= auto error= ignore depend= Winmgmt displayname= "OpenStack Neutron Open vSwitch Agent Service" obj= LocalSystem
[SC] CreateService SUCCESS
 
C:\Users\Administrator>notepad "c:\Program Files\Cloudbase Solutions\OpenStack\Nova\etc\neutron_ovs_agent.conf"
 
C:\Users\Administrator>sc start neutron-ovs-agent
 
SERVICE_NAME: neutron-ovs-agent
        TYPE               : 10  WIN32_OWN_PROCESS
        STATE              : 2  START_PENDING
                                (STOPPABLE, NOT_PAUSABLE, ACCEPTS_SHUTDOWN)
        WIN32_EXIT_CODE    : 0  (0x0)
        SERVICE_EXIT_CODE  : 0  (0x0)
        CHECKPOINT         : 0x1
        WAIT_HINT          : 0x0
        PID                : 2740
        FLAGS              :

Note: creating a service manually for the OVS agent won’t be necessary anymore starting with the next Nova Hyper-V MSI installer version.

Here is the content of the neutron_ovs_agent.conf file:

[DEFAULT]
verbose=true
debug=false
control_exchange=neutron
policy_file=C:\Program Files\Cloudbase Solutions\OpenStack\Nova\etc\policy.json
rpc_backend=neutron.openstack.common.rpc.impl_kombu
rabbit_host=14.14.14.1
rabbit_port=5672
rabbit_userid=stackrabbit
rabbit_password=Passw0rd
logdir=C:\OpenStack\Log\
logfile=neutron-ovs-agent.log
[agent]
tunnel_types = vxlan
enable_metrics_collection=false
[SECURITYGROUP]
enable_security_group=false
[ovs]
local_ip = 14.14.14.2
tunnel_bridge = br-tun
integration_bridge = br-int
tenant_network_type = vxlan
enable_tunneling = true

Now if we run ovs-vsctl show, we can see a VXLAN tunnel in place:

PS C:\> ovs-vsctl.exe show
a81a54fc-0a3c-4152-9a0d-f3cbf4abc3ca
    Bridge br-int
        fail_mode: secure
        Port patch-tun
            Interface patch-tun
                type: patch
                options: {peer=patch-int}
        Port br-int
            Interface br-int
                type: internal
    Bridge br-tun
        fail_mode: secure
        Port br-tun
            Interface br-tun
                type: internal
        Port patch-int
            Interface patch-int
                type: patch
                options: {peer=patch-tun}
        Port "vxlan-0e0e0e01"
            Interface "vxlan-0e0e0e01"
                type: vxlan
                options: {df_default="true", in_key=flow, local_ip="14.14.14.2", out_key=flow, remote_ip="14.14.14.1"}
    Bridge "br-port1"
        Port "port1"
            Interface "port1"
        Port "br-port1"
            Interface "br-port1"
                type: internal

After spawning a Nova instance on the Hyper-V node you should see:

PS C:\> get-vm
 
Name              State   CPUUsage(%) MemoryAssigned(M) Uptime   Status
----              -----   ----------- ----------------- ------   ------
instance-00000003 Running 0           512               00:01:09 Operating normally
 
 
PS C:\Users\Administrator> Get-VMConsole instance-00000003
PS C:\> ovs-vsctl.exe show
a81a54fc-0a3c-4152-9a0d-f3cbf4abc3ca
    Bridge br-int
        fail_mode: secure
        Port "f44f4971-4a75-4ba8-9df7-2e316f799155"
            tag: 1
            Interface "f44f4971-4a75-4ba8-9df7-2e316f799155"
        Port patch-tun
            Interface patch-tun
                type: patch
                options: {peer=patch-int}
        Port br-int
            Interface br-int
                type: internal
    Bridge br-tun
        fail_mode: secure
        Port br-tun
            Interface br-tun
                type: internal
        Port patch-int
            Interface patch-int
                type: patch
                options: {peer=patch-tun}
        Port "vxlan-0e0e0e01"
            Interface "vxlan-0e0e0e01"
                type: vxlan
                options: {df_default="true", in_key=flow, local_ip="14.14.14.2", out_key=flow, remote_ip="14.14.14.1"}
    Bridge "br-port1"
        Port "port1"
            Interface "port1"
        Port "br-port1"
            Interface "br-port1"
                type: internal

In this example, “f44f4971-4a75-4ba8-9df7-2e316f799155” is the OVS port name associated to the instance-00000003 VM vnic. You can find out the details by running the following PowerShell cmdlet:

PS C:\Users\Administrator> Get-VMByOVSPort -OVSPortName "f44f4971-4a75-4ba8-9df7-2e316f799155"
...
ElementName                          : instance-00000003
...

The VM, instance-00000003, got an IP address from the neutron DHCP agent, with fully functional networking between KVM and Hyper-V hosted virtual machines!

This is everything you need to get started with OpenStack, Hyper-V and OVS.

In the next blog post we will show you how to manage Hyper-V on OVS without OpenStack using a VXLAN tunnel.

This post first appeared on the Cloudbase Solutions blog. Superuser is always interested in community content, email: [email protected]

Cover Photo // CC BY NC

  • Leandro Reox

    Hi, how about DVR ? since for now the support is for one virtual switch, i cannot create another bridge (br-ex) asociated with another OVS managed vswitch, in order to plug the external networks there, or even another flat bridge mappings (br-flat). So here the only networking mode supported is legacy with network node, am i right ?

    • Alin Serdean

      No that is incorrect.
      You can create as many bridges as you want/need.
      You can add multiple NICS to a managed OVS vswitch (via the powershell commandlets: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj553814(v=wps.630).aspx), and add them under the bridge you want to associate them.
      Neutron OVS L3 agent still relies in some parts on iptables, it is not fully portable too Windows yet. However, using OVN will provide DVR also on Windows.

  • Ronaldo Barros

    Hello
    I installed the Open vSwitch on Hyper-V, more was not created the interfaces br-tun and br-int, what I have to do?

    Thank you

  • Ronaldo Barros

    Hello
    Do you need to install OpenStack ™ Hyper-V Compute Driver together with Cloudbase Open vSwitch ™ (OVS) for Windows® ?

    thank you

    • Alin Serdean

      Hi,

      As described in the tutorial, yes you will need the OpenStack Hyper-V compute driver together with OVS installer for this particular use case.

  • Ronaldo Barros

    Hello
    I followed your tutorial and I got
    Just having a problem that the agent is not getting online
    Would you help me?
    thank you https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d1c04f6ca692f7121f7ec5e1a6769ca6a64b64cf730000acb84fbf27cb47971a.png

    • Alin Serdean

      Hi,
      From the screenshot you posted above I see that you have neutron-openvswitch-agent running on Host-01. As described in the tutorial we disable the service neutron-hyperv-agent (“sc config “neutron-hyperv-agent” start=disabled”) and we expose the new agent: neutron-openvswitch-agent.

      If you feel you hit a bug please feel free to open an issue via: http://ask.cloudbase.it/questions/ . Please share the logs and details about your environment.

      Thanks.