Superuser TV talks to OpenSwitch’s Albert Fishman about opening the billion-dollar networking market to more than the “elite.”

SuperuserTV sat down with Albert Fishman, marketing chair of OpenSwitch to find out more about the project.

Started by HP and now part of the Linux Foundation, it was one 11 open source projects participating in the Open Source Days at the OpenStack Summit Boston. OpenSwitch was born from the need to decouple OpenSwitch is an open source, Linux-based network operating system (NOS) designed to power enterprise-grade switches from multiple hardware vendors that will enable organizations to rapidly build datacenter networks that are customized for unique business needs.

“It was a very observable response to the market needs of disaggregation and switching,” Fishman says. “People are trying to decouple the software and the hardware. The refreshment cycles in hardware are driven by speeds and feeds needs while the software cadence is driven by a faster pace of innovation.” It’s a huge market, he adds, that in 2017 will reach almost a billion dollars in revenue — but one that’s still closed to all but a networking “elite” — Google, Facebook, Amazon etc. OpenSwitch aims to open the way for users outside those giants.

Catch the entire three-minute interview below for more on what to expect from the project in the next six-12 months. “Our target is to see it being deployed, that would be a huge achievement,” he says. “We’ll also integrate with other technologies including OpenStack.”

  • You said “People are trying to decouple the software and the hardware.” — it’s interesting how both networking and server technologies are moving away from vertical integration. That being said, there seem to be use cases for both approaches to coexist within the marketplace. Meaning, this is clearly about offering a choice that is dependent upon the application requirements.